Overcoming Frustration with Technology

For whatever reason, when we get a new boost in productivity, whether that be from a tool, technology or technique…we quickly forget how much more efficient it’s made us. It’s human nature. It’s like the commuter who gets angry about how bad traffic is, but forgets what a pain it was to wait for the bus. Or the cell phone user who complains about a bad connection, and forgets about the days when he had to fish for spare change to make a call from a pay phone.

It’s much the same with technology.

If your plan for your online business is in a long term one, there’s no getting around it: You will have to find a way to overcome the frustrations you will have with technology. It’s inevitable.

Here are some simple tips for dealing with the frustration

Slow down.

Let’s start with an analogy: When you’re driving a car at 100 miles per hour, a small thing like a bumblebee hitting the windshield can cause you to lose control and crash. How does this translate to online frustration?

When you’re straining your systems and technology to work faster and better for you, the smallest technical glitch can have a bigger impact on your performance than seems logical. That’s because you are pushing for “more, faster and better” in the first place.

The solution is to slow down. What this means for you as a carbon-based being is: take a stretch break, breathe a couple deep breaths and generally loosen up. Lighten your grip on the intensity you are trying to sustain, both for yourself and your systems.

Concretely, this may mean taking care of your email just a little bit slower. Typing not quite as fast. Or giving yourself an extra hour to set up your new audio recorder. The extra time spent is worth it if it means you don’t have to clean up a tangle later. This may seem counterproductive, but it gives your tools time to do their work for you. Sometimes you have to slow down to get to your destination sooner.

Change channels.

Online frustration is something most people experience from time to time, and this includes your suppliers or contractors. If you have a virtual assistant, you likely know this first hand. The next time you, a colleague or assistant experiences frustration with technology, suggest they “change channels”. This means exactly what you think it means, that is, switch tasks.

If your technology is acting up, try switching to an activity that comes naturally to you before going back to solve the problem. There’s no point forcing something to work when it is resisting you. Go where the energy is flowing by changing channels.

“Remember when.”

Yes, a little reminiscing can be the perfect medicine when you’re struggling with technology. As you try to set up your email account for the 12th time, consider the fact that just 10 years ago, thousands of small business owners did not have email, and did all their correspondence by mail, telephone or fax. Do you remember your “mail inbox” in the last office you worked in? How about letter openers, overflowing voicemail boxes or wet sponges to seal piles of envelopes? Remember when we used to get paper cuts on a regular basis?

With the increasing growth of the personal development movement in the last 10 years, many of us have learned to become more self-aware and handle anger, frustration and other strong emotions with techniques such as meditation, journaling or even prayer.

But because the Internet is a new-ish modality, sometimes we forget to apply these relaxation techniques to handle “cyber” stress. The next time you have the technology blues, stop. Don’t struggle. Instead, become child-like — slow down and enjoy, play awhile, and laugh a little about the wonder of it all.

The Development of Old Age and Related Issues

In traditional Chinese and other Asian cultures the aged were highly respected and cared for. The Igabo tribesmen of Eastern Nigeria value dependency in their aged and involve them in care of children and the administration of tribal affairs (Shelton, A. in Kalish R. Uni Michigan 1969).

In Eskimo culture the grandmother was pushed out into the ice-flow to die as soon as she became useless.

Western societies today usually resemble to some degree the Eskimo culture, only the “ice-flows” have names such a “Sunset Vista” and the like. Younger generations no longer assign status to the aged and their abandonment

is always in danger of becoming the social norm.

There has been a tendency to remove the aged from their homes and put them  in custodial care. To some degree the government provides domiciliary care services to prevent or delay this, but the motivation probably has more

to do with expense than humanity.

In Canada and some parts of the USA old people are being utilised as foster-grandparents in child care agencies.

SOME BASIC DEFINITIONS

What is Aging?

Aging: Aging is a natural phenomenon that refers to changes occurring throughout the life span and result in differences in structure and function between the youthful and elder generation.

Gerontology: Gerontology is the study of aging and includes science, psychology and sociology.

Geriatrics: A relatively new field of medicine specialising in the health problems of advanced age.

Social aging: Refers to the social habits and roles of individuals with respect to their culture and society. As social aging increases individual usually experience a decrease in meaningful social interactions.

Biological aging: Refers to the physical changes in the body systems during the later decades of life. It may begin long before the individual  reaches chronological age 65.

Cognitive aging: Refers to decreasing ability to assimilate new information and learn new behaviours and skills.

GENERAL PROBLEMS OF AGING

Eric Erikson (Youth and the life cycle. Children. 7:43-49 Mch/April 1960) developed an “ages and stages” theory of human

development that involved 8 stages after birth each of which involved a basic dichotomy representing best case and worst case outcomes. Below are the dichotomies and their developmental relevance:

Prenatal stage – conception to birth.

1. Infancy. Birth to 2 years – basic trust vs. basic distrust. Hope.

2. Early childhood, 3 to 4 years – autonomy vs. self doubt/shame. Will.

3. Play age, 5 to 8 years – initiative vs. guilt. Purpose.

4. School age, 9to 12 – industry vs. inferiority. Competence.

5. Adolescence, 13 to 19 – identity vs. identity confusion. Fidelity.

6. Young adulthood – intimacy vs. isolation. Love.

7. Adulthood, generativity vs. self absorption. Care.

8. Mature age- Ego Integrity vs. Despair. Wisdom.

This stage of older adulthood, i.e. stage 8, begins about the time of retirement and continues throughout one’s life. Achieving ego integrity  is a sign of maturity while failing to reach this stage is an indication of poor development in prior stages through the life course.

Ego integrity: This means coming to accept one’s whole life and reflecting on it in a positive manner. According to Erikson, achieving

integrity means fully accepting one’ self and coming to terms with death. Accepting responsibility for one’s life and being able to review

the past with satisfaction is essential. The inability to do this leads to despair and the individual will begin to fear death. If a favourable balance is achieved during this stage, then wisdom is developed.

Psychological and personality aspects:

Aging has psychological implications. Next to dying our recognition that we are aging may be one of the most profound shocks we ever receive. Once we pass the invisible line of 65 our years are bench marked for the remainder of the game of life. We are no longer “mature age” we are instead classified as “old”, or “senior citizens”. How we cope with the changes we face and stresses of altered status depends on our basic personality. Here are 3 basic personality types that have been identified. It may be a oversimplification but it makes the point about personality effectively:

a. The autonomous – people who seem to have the resources for self-renewal. They may be dedicated to a goal or idea and committed to continuing productivity. This appears to protect them somewhat even against physiological aging.

b.The adjusted – people who are rigid and lacking in adaptability but are supported by their power, prestige or well structured routine. But if their situation changes drastically they become psychiatric casualties.

c.The anomic. These are people who do not have clear inner values or a protective life vision. Such people have been described as prematurely resigned and they may deteriorate rapidly.

Summary of stresses of old age.

a. Retirement and reduced income. Most people rely on work for self worth, identity and social interaction. Forced retirement can be demoralising.

b. Fear of invalidism and death. The increased probability of falling prey to illness from which there is no recovery is a continual

source of anxiety. When one has a heart attack or stroke the stress becomes much worse.

Some persons face death with equanimity, often psychologically supported by a religion or philosophy. Others may welcome death as an end to suffering or insoluble problems and with little concern for life or human existence. Still others face impending death with suffering of great stress against which they have no ego defenses.

c. Isolation and loneliness. Older people face inevitable loss of loved ones, friends and contemporaries. The loss of a spouse whom one has depended on for companionship and moral support is particularly distressing. Children grow up, marry and become preoccupied or move away. Failing memory, visual and aural impairment may all work to make social interaction difficult. And if this

then leads to a souring of outlook and rigidity of attitude then social interaction becomes further lessened and the individual may not even utilise the avenues for social activity that are still available.

d. Reduction in sexual function and physical attractiveness. Kinsey et al, in their Sexual behaviour in the human male,

(Phil., Saunders, 1948) found that there is a gradual decrease in sexual activity with advancing age and that reasonably gratifying patterns of sexual activity can continue into extreme old age. The aging person also has to adapt to loss of sexual attractiveness in a society which puts extreme emphasis on sexual attractiveness. The adjustment in self image and self concept that are required can be very hard to make.

e. Forces tending to self devaluation. Often the experience of the older generation has little perceived relevance to the problems of the young and the older person becomes deprived of participation in decision making both in occupational and family settings. Many parents are seen as unwanted burdens and their children may secretly wish they would die so they can be free of the burden and experience some financial relief or benefit. Senior citizens may be pushed into the role of being an old person with all this implies in terms of self devaluation.

4 Major Categories of Problems or Needs:

Health.

Housing.

Income maintenance.

Interpersonal relations.

BIOLOGICAL CHANGES

Physiological Changes: Catabolism (the breakdown of protoplasm) overtakes anabolism (the build-up of protoplasm). All body systems are affected and repair systems become slowed. The aging process occurs at different rates in different individuals.

Physical appearance and other changes:

Loss of subcutaneous fat and less elastic skin gives rise to wrinkled appearance, sagging and loss of smoothness of body contours. Joints stiffen and become painful and range of joint movement becomes restricted, general

mobility lessened.

Respiratory changes:

Increase of fibrous tissue in chest walls and lungs leads restricts respiratory movement and less oxygen is consumed. Older people more likelyto have lower respiratory infections whereas young people have upper respiratory infections.

Nutritive changes:

Tooth decay and loss of teeth can detract from ease and enjoyment in eating. Atrophy of the taste buds means food is inclined to be tasteless and this should be taken into account by carers. Digestive changes occur from lack of exercise (stimulating intestines) and decrease in digestive juice production. Constipation and indigestion are likely to follow as a result. Financial problems can lead to the elderly eating an excess of cheap carbohydrates rather than the more expensive protein and vegetable foods and this exacerbates the problem, leading to reduced vitamin intake and such problems as anemia and increased susceptibility to infection.

Adaptation to stress:

All of us face stress at all ages. Adaptation to stress requires the consumption of energy. The 3 main phases of stress are:

1. Initial alarm reaction. 2. Resistance. 3. Exhaustion

and if stress continues tissue damage or aging occurs. Older persons have had a lifetime of dealing with stresses. Energy reserves are depleted and the older person succumbs to stress earlier than the younger person. Stress is cumulative over a lifetime. Research results, including experiments with animals suggests that each stress leaves us more vulnerable to the next and that although we might think we’ve “bounced back” 100% in fact each stress leaves it scar. Further, stress is psycho-biological meaning

the kind of stress is irrelevant. A physical stress may leave one more vulnerable to psychological stress and vice versa. Rest does not completely restore one after a stressor. Care workers need to be mindful of this and cognizant of the kinds of things that can produce stress for aged persons.

COGNITIVE CHANGE Habitual Behaviour:

Sigmund Freud noted that after the age of 50, treatment of neuroses via psychoanalysis was difficult because the opinions and reactions of older people were relatively fixed and hard to shift.

Over-learned behaviour: This is behaviour that has been learned so well and repeated so often that it has become automatic, like for example typing or running down stairs. Over-learned behaviour is hard to change. If one has lived a long time one is likely to have fixed opinions and ritualised behaviour patterns or habits.

Compulsive behaviour: Habits and attitudes that have been learned in the course of finding ways to overcome frustration and difficulty are very hard to break. Tension reducing habits such as nail biting, incessant humming, smoking or drinking alcohol are especially hard to change at any age and particularly hard for persons who have been practising them over a life time.

The psychology of over-learned and compulsive behaviours has severe implications for older persons who find they have to live in what for them is a new and alien environment with new rules and power relations.

Information acquisition:

Older people have a continual background of neural noise making it more difficult for them to sort out and interpret complex sensory

input. In talking to an older person one should turn off the TV, eliminate as many noises and distractions as possible, talk slowly

and relate to one message or idea at a time.

Memories from the distant past are stronger than more recent memories. New memories are the first to fade and last to return.

Time patterns also can get mixed – old and new may get mixed.

Intelligence.

Intelligence reaches a peak and can stay high with little deterioration if there is no neurological damage. People who have unusually high intelligence to begin with seem to suffer the least decline. Education and stimulation also seem to play a role in maintaining intelligence.

Intellectual impairment. Two diseases of old age causing cognitive decline are Alzheimer’s syndrome and Pick’s syndrome. In Pick’s syndrome there is inability to concentrate and learn and also affective responses are impaired.

Degenerative Diseases: Slow progressive physical degeneration of cells in the nervous system. Genetics appear to be an important factor. Usually start after age 40 (but can occur as early as 20s).

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Degeneration of all areas of cortex but particularly frontal and temporal lobes. The affected cells actually die. Early symptoms resemble neurotic disorders: Anxiety, depression, restlessness sleep difficulties.

Progressive deterioration of all intellectual faculties (memory deficiency being the most well known and obvious). Total mass of the brain decreases, ventricles become larger. No established treatment.

PICK’S DISEASE Rare degenerative disease. Similar to Alzheimer’s in terms of onset, symptomatology and possible genetic

aetiology. However it affects circumscribed areas of the brain, particularly the frontal areas which leads to a loss of normal affect.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE Neuropathology: Loss of neurons in the basal ganglia.

Symptoms: Movement abnormalities: rhythmical alternating tremor of extremities, eyelids and tongue along with rigidity of the muscles and slowness of movement (akinesia).

It was once thought that Parkinson’s disease was not associated with intellectual deterioration, but it is now known that there is an association between global intellectual impairment and Parkinson’s where it occurs late in life.

The cells lost in Parkinson’s are associated with the neuro-chemical Dopamine and the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s are associated the dopamine deficiency. Treatment involves administration of dopamine precursor L-dopa which can alleviate symptoms including intellectual impairment. Research suggests it may possibly bring to the fore emotional effects in patients who have had

psychiatric illness at some prior stage in their lives.

AFFECTIVE DOMAIN In old age our self concept gets its final revision. We make a final assessment of the value of our lives and our balance of success and failures.

How well a person adapts to old age may be predicated by how well the person adapted to earlier significant changes. If the person suffered an emotional crisis each time a significant change was needed then adaptation to the exigencies of old age may also be difficult. Factors such as economic security, geographic location and physical health are important to the adaptive process.

Need Fulfilment: For all of us, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory, we are not free to pursue the higher needs of self actualisation unless the basic needs are secured. When one considers that many, perhaps most, old people are living in poverty and continually concerned with basic survival needs, they are not likely to be happily satisfying needs related to prestige, achievement and beauty.

Maslow’s Hierarchy

Physiological

Safety

Belonging, love, identification

Esteem: Achievement, prestige, success, self respect

Self actualisation: Expressing one’s interests and talents to the full.

Note: Old people who have secured their basic needs may be motivated to work on tasks of the highest levels in the hierarchy – activities concerned with aesthetics, creativity and altruistic matters, as compensation for loss of sexual attractiveness and athleticism. Aged care workers fixated on getting old people to focus on social activities may only succeed in frustrating and irritating them if their basic survival concerns are not secured to their satisfaction.

DISENGAGEMENT

Social aging according to Cumming, E. and Henry, W. (Growing old: the aging process of disengagement, NY, Basic 1961) follows a well defined pattern:

1. Change in role. Change in occupation and productivity. Possibly change

in attitude to work.

2. Loss of role, e.g. retirement or death of a husband.

3. Reduced social interaction. With loss of role social interactions are

diminished, eccentric adjustment can further reduce social interaction, damage

to self concept, depression.

4. Awareness of scarcity of remaining time. This produces further curtailment of

activity in interest of saving time.

Havighurst, R. et al (in B. Neugarten (ed.) Middle age and aging, U. of Chicago, 1968) and others have suggested that disengagement is not an inevitable process. They believe the needs of the old are essentially the same as in middle age and the activities of middle age should be extended as long as possible. Havighurst points out the decrease in social interaction of the aged is often largely the

result of society withdrawing from the individual as much as the reverse. To combat this he believes the individual must vigorously resist the limitations of his social world.

DEATH The fear of the dead amongst tribal societies is well established. Persons who had ministered to the dead were taboo and required observe various rituals including seclusion for varying periods of time. In some societies from South America to Australia it is taboo for certain persons to utter the name of the dead. Widows and widowers are expected to observe rituals in respect for the dead.

Widows in the Highlands of New Guinea around Goroka chop of one of their own fingers. The dead continue their existence as spirits and upsetting them can bring dire consequences.

Wahl, C in “The fear of death”, 1959 noted that the fear of death occurs as early as the 3rd year of life. When a child loses a pet or grandparent fears reside in the unspoken questions: Did I cause it? Will happen to you (parent) soon? Will this happen to me? The child in such situations needs to re-assure that the departure is not a censure, and that the parent is not likely to depart soon. Love, grief, guilt, anger are a mix of conflicting emotions that are experienced.

CONTEMPORARY ATTITUDES TO DEATH

Our culture places high value on youth, beauty, high status occupations, social class and anticipated future activities and achievement. Aging and dying are denied and avoided in this system. The death of each person reminds us of our own mortality.

The death of the elderly is less disturbing to members of Western society because the aged are not especially valued. Surveys have established that nurses for example attach more importance to saving a young life than an old life. In Western society there is a pattern of avoiding dealing with the aged and dying aged patient.

Stages of dying. Elisabeth Kubler Ross has specialised in working with dying patients and in her “On death and dying”, NY, Macmillan, 1969, summarised 5 stages in dying.

1. Denial and isolation. “No, not me”.

2. Anger. “I’ve lived a good life so why me?”

3. Bargaining. Secret deals are struck with God. “If I can live until…I promise to…”

4. Depression. (In general the greatest psychological problem of the aged is depression). Depression results from real and threatened loss.

5. Acceptance of the inevitable.

Kubler Ross’s typology as set out above should, I believe be taken with a grain of salt and not slavishly accepted. Celebrated US Journalist David Rieff who was in June ’08 a guest of the Sydney writer’s festival in relation to his book, “Swimming in a sea of death: a son’s memoir” (Melbourne University Press) expressly denied the validity of the Kubler Ross typology in his Late Night Live interview (Australian ABC radio) with Philip Adams June 9th ’08. He said something to the effect that his mother had regarded her impending death as murder. My own experience with dying persons suggests that the human ego is extraordinarily resilient. I recall visiting a dying colleague in hospital just days before his death. He said, “I’m dying, I don’t like it but there’s nothing I can do about it”, and then went on to chortle about how senior academics at an Adelaide university had told him they were submitting his name for a the Order of Australia (the new “Knighthood” replacement in Australia). Falling in and out of lucid thought with an oxygen tube in his nostrils he was nevertheless still highly interested in the “vain glories of the world”. This observation to me seemed consistent with Rieff’s negative assessment of Kubler Ross’s theories.

THE AGED IN RELATION TO YOUNGER PEOPLE

The aged share with the young the same needs: However, the aged often have fewer or weaker resources to meet those needs. Their need for social interaction may be ignored by family and care workers.

Family should make time to visit their aged members and invite them to their homes. The aged like to visit children and relate to them through games and stories.

Meaningful relationships can be developed via foster-grandparent programs. Some aged are not aware of their income and health entitlements. Family and friends should take the time to explain these. Some aged are too proud to access their entitlements and this problem should be addressed in a kindly way where it occurs.

It is best that the aged be allowed as much choice as possible in matters related to living arrangements, social life and lifestyle.

Communities serving the aged need to provide for the aged via such things as lower curbing, and ramps.

Carers need to examine their own attitude to aging and dying. Denial in the carer is detected by the aged person and it can inhibit the aged person from expressing negative feelings – fear, anger. If the person can express these feelings to someone then that person is less likely to die with a sense of isolation and bitterness.

A METAPHYSICAL PERSPECTIVE

The following notes are my interpretation of a Dr. Depak Chopra lecture entitled, “The New Physics of Healing” which he presented to the 13th Scientific Conference of the American Holistic Medical Association. Dr. Depak Chopra is an endocrinologist and a former Chief of Staff of New England Hospital, Massachusetts. I am deliberately omitting the detail of his explanations of the more abstract, ephemeral and controversial ideas.

Original material from 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

In the lecture Dr. Chopra presents a model of the universe and of all organisms as structures of interacting centres of electromagnetic energy linked to each other in such a way that anything affecting one part of a system or structure has ramifications throughout the entire structure. This model becomes an analogue not only for what happens within the structure or organism itself, but between the organism and both its physical and social environments. In other words there is a correlation between psychological

conditions, health and the aging process. Dr. Chopra in his lecture reconciles ancient Vedic (Hindu) philosophy with modern psychology and quantum physics.

Premature Precognitive Commitment: Dr. Chopra invokes experiments that have shown that flies kept for a long time in a jar do not quickly leave the jar when the top is taken off. Instead they accept the jar as the limit of their universe. He also points out that in India baby elephants are often kept tethered to a small twig or sapling. In adulthood when the elephant is capable of pulling over a medium sized tree it can still be successfully tethered to a twig! As another example he points to experiments in which fish are bred on

2 sides of a fish tank containing a divider between the 2 sides. When the divider is removed the fish are slow to learn that they can now swim throughout the whole tank but rather stay in the section that they accept as their universe. Other experiments have demonstrated that kittens brought up in an environment of vertical stripes and structures, when released in adulthood keep bumping into anything aligned horizontally as if they were unable to see anything that is horizontal. Conversely kittens brought up in an environment of horizontal stripes when released bump into vertical structures, apparently unable to see them.

The whole point of the above experiments is that they demonstrate Premature Precognitive Commitment. The lesson to be learned is that our sensory apparatus develops as a result of initial experience and how we’ve been taught to interpret it.

What is the real look of the world? It doesn’t exist. The way the world looks to us is determined by the sensory receptors we have and our interpretation of that look is determined by our premature precognitive commitments. Dr Chopra makes the point that less than a billionth of the available stimuli make it into our nervous systems. Most of it is screened, and what gets through to us is whatever we are

expecting to find on the basis of our precognitive commitments.

Dr. Chopra also discusses the diseases that are actually caused by mainstream medical interventions, but this material gets too far away from my central intention. Dr. Chopra discusses in lay terms the physics of matter, energy and time by way of establishing the wider context of our existence. He makes the point that our bodies including the bodies of plants are mirrors of cosmic rhythms and exhibit changes correlating even with the tides.

Dr. Chopra cites the experiments of Dr. Herbert Spencer of the US National Institute of Health. He injected mice with Poly-IC, an immuno-stimulant while making the mice repeatedly smell camphor. After the effect of the Poly-IC had worn off he again exposed the mice to the camphor smell. The smell of camphor had the effect of causing the mice’s immune system to automatically strengthen

as if they had been injected with the stimulant. He then took another batch of mice and injected them with cyclophosphamide which tends to destroy the immune system while exposing them to the smell of camphor. Later after being returned to normal just the smell of camphor was enough to cause destruction of their immune system. Dr. Chopra points out that whether or not camphor enhanced or

destroyed the mice’s immune system was entirely determined by an interpretation of the meaning of the smell of camphor. The interpretation is not just in the brain but in each cell of the organism. We are bound to our imagination and our

early experiences.

Chopra cites a study by the Massachusetts Dept of Health Education and Welfare into risk factors for heart disease – family history, cholesterol etc. The 2 most important risk factors were found to be psychological measures – Self  Happiness Rating and Job Satisfaction. They found most people died of heart disease on a Monday!

Chopra says that for every feeling there is a molecule. If you are experiencing tranquillity your body will be producing natural valium. Chemical changes in the brain are reflected by changes in other cells including blood cells. The brain produces neuropeptides and brain structures are chemically tuned to these neuropeptide receptors. Neuropeptides (neurotransmitters) are the chemical concommitants of thought. Chopra points out the white blood cells (a part of the immune system) have neuropeptide receptors and are “eavesdropping” on our thinking. Conversely the immune system produces its own neuropeptides which can influence the nervous system. He goes on to say that cells in all parts of the body including heart and kidneys for example also produce neuropeptides and

neuropeptide sensitivity. Chopra assures us that most neurologists would agree that the nervous system and the immune system are parallel systems.

Other studies in physiology: The blood interlukin-2 levels of medical students decreased as exam time neared and their interlukin receptor capacities also lowered. Chopra says if we are having fun to the point of exhilaration our natural interlukin-2 levels become higher. Interlukin-2 is a powerful and very expensive anti-cancer drug. The body is a printout of consciousness. If we could change the way we look at our bodies at a genuine, profound level then our bodies would actually change.

On the subject of “time” Chopra cites Sir Thomas Gall and Steven Hawkins, stating that our description of the universe as having a past, present, and future are constructed entirely out of our interpretation of change. But in

reality linear time doesn’t exist.

Chopra explains the work of Alexander Leaf a former Harvard Professor of Preventative Medicine who toured the world investigating societies where people  lived beyond 100 years (these included parts of Afghanistan, Soviet Georgia, Southern Andes). He looked at possible factors including climate, genetics, and diet. Leaf concluded the most important factor was the collective perception of aging in these societies.

Amongst the Tama Humara of the Southern Andes there was a collective belief that the older you got the more physically able you got. They had a tradition of running and the older one became then generally the better at running one got. The best runner was aged 60. Lung capacity and other measures actually improved with age. People were healthy until well into their 100s and died in their sleep. Chopra remarks that things have changed since the introduction of Budweiser (beer) and TV.

[DISCUSSION: How might TV be a factor in changing the former ideal state of things?]

Chopra refers to Dr. Ellen Langor a former Harvard Psychology professor’s work. Langor advertised for 100 volunteers aged over 70 years. She took them to a Monastery outside Boston to play “Let’s Pretend”. They were divided into 2 groups each of which resided in a different part of the building. One group, the control group spent several days talking about the 1950s. The other group, the experimental group had to live as if in the year 1959 and talk about it in the present tense. What appeared on their TV screens were the old newscasts and movies. They read old newspapers and magazines of the period. After 3 days everyone was photographed and the photographs judged by independent judges who knew nothing of the nature of the experiment. The experimental group seemed to

have gotten younger in appearance. Langor then arranged for them to be tested for 100 physiological parameters of aging which included of course blood pressure, near point vision and DHEA levels. After 10 days of living as if in 1959 all parameters had reversed by the equivalent of at least 20 years.

Chopra concludes from Langor’s experiment: “We are the metabolic end product of our sensory experiences. How we interpret them depends on the collective mindset which influences individual biological entropy and aging.”

Can one escape the current collective mindset and reap the benefits in longevity and health? Langor says, society won’t let you escape. There are too many reminders of how most people think linear time is and how it expresses itself in entropy and aging – men are naughty at 40 and on social welfare at 55, women reach menopause at 40 etc. We get to see so many other people aging and dying that it sets the pattern that we follow.

Chopra concludes we are the metabolic product of our sensory experience and our interpretation gets structured in our biology itself. Real change comes from change in the collective consciousness – otherwise it cannot occur within the individual.

Readings

Chopra, D. The New Physics of Healing. 735 Walnut Street, Boulder, Colorado 83002,

Phone. +303 449 6229.

Coleman, J. C. Abnormal psychology and modern life. Scott Foresman & Co.

Lugo, J. and Hershey, L. Human development a multidisciplinary approach to the psychology of individual growth, NY, Macmillan.

Dennis. Psychology of human behaviour for nurses. Lond. W. B.Saunders.

Does The Apple Wireless Keyboard Replace The iPad Keyboard Bluetooth Enabled?

The Apple iPad is a wonderful machine, but the default virtual keyboard makes word processing–at least for this writer–a bit tedious. Talk about non-ergonomic! There are a number of Bluetooth enabled keyboards out there that web talk says will work on the iPad, but knowing how difficult Apple can make it on non-Apple hardware, I decided on the Bluetooth Keyboard for iPad made by Apple.

This was not the one in the package marked as an iPad keyboard bluetooth enabled containing the dock; this was the older wireless number. The dock works well enough but it makes for an awkward package in your briefcase and I like to move the keyboard around without attachments…why else use a wireless keyboard? Besides, the price was the same.

But one question worried me: Would the virtual keyboard still appear when the Bluetooth keyboard was attached? If it did, it would make for an awkward appearing redundancy and still continue to block out and darken the screen. When asked, two of the Apple specialists at the local BestBuy could not answer the question. A stupid question? Ah, but then this writer harkens back to a time when cursive was still king!

And the answer is… No, it will not appear unless you hit the special key on the Bluetooth keyboard for iPad. The Bluetooth keyboard is smaller than usual and takes some getting used to, but is still head and shoulders better for typing of any volume than the one that appears when summoned on the iPad screen.

There are other issues, of course. Google Docs didn’t want to cooperate with the keyboard and I will probably have to purchase an application specially made for the iPad whether I like it or not. But the answer to the question posed by the title is, yes, the Apple wireless keyboard does replace the virtual default keyboard on the iPad. And, even more important, it is a pleasure to use.

Gotta Get Big for Football!

On the first day of Football practice when I was entering the 10th grade, the coaches took our height and weight, and told us to bench press our bodyweight as many times as we could.

I was fifteen years old, 6 feet tall and 160 pounds. I played Center and Defensive End. The only bench pressing I had done was lying on the floor pressing the 100 pound plastic-coated cement weights my parents bought at the department store. The guys I was lifting with on my first day of practice were a little smaller than me, and had to press 135 pounds, but they only did it for a few reps. Before adding anymore weight, I wanted to try the 135. It was a good thing that we didn’t add any weight, because I couldn’t even press the 135 once! I was embarrassed that I was so weak, and I knew I had to get stronger.

The next blow came a couple of weeks later when I found out that my Mom had gone to the coaches to express her concern. She told the coach, “Aaron is so small and skinny that I am afraid he will be crushed by those older boys.” That did it. Now I was mad! There was no way that I was going to be crushed by anybody, and there was no way I was going to be small and skinny for that matter!

The funny thing about it was that even though I was small, skinny and weak, I was actually pretty good for a guy who had only played organized football for one season. We had enough guys that we were split into three teams. The Varsity was for the best of the best no matter what grade they were in. The JV was for those who weren’t quite good enough for the Varsity, and was mostly Juniors, with some Seniors and Sophomores. The Sophomore team was for all of the 10th grade players who were not good enough for the Varsity. Most of them played only on the Sophomore team, but I was different. I played for the Sophomore team each week, and that was just fun. I mean the competition was weak, and I was hitting the Quarterback on almost every play. Some of the 10th graders were good enough to play on the JV team each week also, and I was one of them. Now three 10th grade players were allowed to dress for the Home Varsity games, and I was one of them. The other two guys were!

wide receivers and they actually played, whereas I was a lineman and I never got in a Varsity game that year.

My 10th grade year was the first year I could take weight training class at school, and I took full advantage of it. I wanted to be the biggest, strongest guy on the Football team, but that was a long way off. The weight training program that the coach put us on was very simple and basic. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays we benched. If we had time after the bench press, we could choose between Military presses for our shoulders, French presses for our triceps, or Barbell curls for our biceps. Sometimes we got to those exercises, but with 4 guys in our group, it didn’t happen often. The workout was 5 sets of 5 reps. Usually, we warmed up with a light weight, like 95 pounds for me in the beginning, for our first set of 5. Each set we added a little more weight, so that only our final set of 5 was all out. Every couple of months the coach had us test our maximum for 1 repetition, even though I couldn’t even do 135 pounds at the beginning of the year, I was quickly b!

ecoming one of the stronger guys.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays our workout consisted of the Squat for 5 sets of 5 reps. If we finished our Squats early, we could do stiff-legged deadlifts or donkey calf raises with our partners sitting on our backs. For the Squats, we used the same protocol as we did with the Bench presses. Starting with a light weight, we added a little bit each set so that our 5th set of 5 was an all out effort. We did not test our maximum on the Squat though.

I put everything I had into my workouts, trying to lift more weight every workout, and trying to beat everyone else. That was important, but it was only half of my plan. Now, I don’t know how I figured it out, and I guess I never really thought about what possible ways there were to get big. It just seemed natural to me that getting big and strong required only three things. First, train as hard and heavy as you can. Second, Eat as much food as you can. Third, have enough desire to make sure that you do the first two things, no matter what. It seems simple, and to tell you the truth, it is. But, most people who want size and strength don’t get it. They think that expensive supplements or fancy exercise equipment will get them where they want to go, but unless they follow the Three Principles for Bulking up, they won’t make it.

When I say eat as much as you can, not everybody understands that I am not talking about gorging yourself once in a while. I am talking about constantly eating and staying full day in and day out. I didn’t know about protein shakes [http://www.nlpbodybuilding.com/protein-powder.html], and nobody had heard of creatine [http://www.nlpbodybuilding.com/creatine.html], but there was food, and I ate as much as I could. I don’t want you to think this is for everybody, but for a teenager or young adult who wants to put on as much muscle and gain as much strength as they can, this way works.

I actually had a girlfriend during this time period, who was very helpful. While there were limits on how much I could eat at my house, she and her parents were more than happy to provide me with as much food as I wanted, whenever I wanted. They cooked me steaks, bought pizza and anything else I wanted. I don’t know if that was part of their plan to keep me around, but it worked, at least for awhile. I remember being at Burger King one night. I was eating 3 Whoppers, some fries, a shake and I don’t remember what else. Two policemen were sitting at a nearby table, and one of them asked my why I was eating so much. My reply to them was the same as it was to everyone of the many people who asked me the same question, “I gotta get big for Football.” That single-minded focus on my goal is why I reached it so quickly.

When I started the 10th grade I could not Bench press 135 pounds. At the end of the school year, I benched 235. When Football started for the next year, I benched 250 and my bodyweight was up from 160 to 190 pounds. I was also 2 inches taller at 6 feet 2. By the end of Football season, I benched 285, and I weighed 200 pounds. I was the best pass rusher on the Varsity team, I had two defensive touchdowns that season, and I was given the nickname of Drago, from Rocky 4. 15 months, more than 150 pounds added to my Bench press, and 40 pounds of muscular bodyweight. Now that is what I call Bulking up!

Aaron Anderton

No Limits Physique [http://www.nlpbodybuilding.com/personaltraining-aaron.html]

Bollywood For Beginners

New to Bollywood? Appreciating its artistry is simply a matter of understanding India’s unique way of filmmaking. Our primer explains the basics:

What is Bollywood?

Bollywood is a term that refers to the Hindi-language film industry based in the Indian city of Mumbai, which used to be called Bombay. Bombay + Hollywood = Bollywood. The term is believed to have been coined by a Western journalist in the 1970s. Many Indians take issue with the word because it implies that Bollywood is a lesser offshoot of Hollywood, when in fact, India produces far more films annually that attract far greater audience numbers globally than the U.S. And, the Indian film industry is older than Hollywood-by one year.

Are all Indian films produced by Bollywood?

No. Bollywood is only one of many film industries in India. Imagine if the U.S. had a thriving Spanish-language film industry that gave Hollywood a run for its money, or regional film industries in Chicago, Atlanta, and Seattle that rivaled L.A.’s. That’s how it is in India. The various Indian film industries are both language- and location-specific. They include Kollywood, which refers to Tamil-language films made in the Kodambakkam district of the city of Chennai; Mollywood, which is Malayalam-language cinema from the state of Kerala; and Tollywood, which refers to both Telugu-language films from the state of Andhra Pradesh and Bengali-language films made in the Tollygunge neighborhood of Kolkata.

While Bollywood and India’s other film industries primarily produce commercial movies, India also has a strong and respected art-film tradition, which is referred to as “parallel cinema.” The delineation between commercial and art film in India is stronger than it is in the U.S. However, that line is beginning to blur as Bollywood is delving into artier projects and Indian art films are aiming for broader appeal.

Are all Bollywood films musicals?

Most Bollywood films include musical numbers. Today’s movies generally have fewer musical numbers than older films. While 10 musical numbers in a film wasn’t unusual in the past, four to six are more typical today. And more and more Bollywood movies don’t have any musical numbers at all.

It’s important to remember that Bollywood films are not musicals in the American sense. Bollywood has more in common with opera than with Broadway. The main function of musical numbers in Bollywood films (and operas) is to express emotion. Broadway musical numbers, on the other hand, primarily drive the plot. While Broadway musical numbers are integrated into the narrative, Bollywood musical numbers usually are not. Rather, they’re metaphors, removed from the plot, that show how a character feels, not what the character is actually doing.

Do the actors sing the songs?

Very rarely. The vast majority of film songs are sung by playback singers, who are famous in their own right.

The movie and music industries in India are inextricably interlinked. Nearly all Indian pop music comes from movie soundtracks.

Why do so many Bollywood actors have the same last name? Are they all related?

Nepotism is common in Bollywood and many actors and filmmakers come from family dynasties that have been in the movie business for generations. However, there are many celebrities with the same common surnames, particularly Khan and Kapoor, who are not related.

How come there’s no sex in Bollywood movies?

Two reasons: social and artistic. Onscreen physical intimacy is frowned upon in India-even kissing is fairly rare. But more importantly, Indian filmmakers are masters of the art of seduction. There may not be any sex in Bollywood movies, but they sure are sexy. In fact, it’s precisely because there’s no sex that they’re filled with so much incredible tension, which is missing entirely from Hollywood movies these days. In the words of film critic Roger Ebert, “it is less erotic to snoggle for 60 minutes than spend 60 seconds wondering if you are about to be snoggled.” He was talking about Bollywood.

Sometimes Bollywood musical numbers act as a substitute for sex, depicting it not in any crass, overt way, but implicitly, even metaphorically. The characters are often so carried away with passion that they suddenly appear in exotic locations around the world-the pyramids of Egypt, the canals of Venice, the mountains of Switzerland-places that have nothing to do with the plot but have everything to do with the limitlessness of fantasy.

Why are Bollywood films so long?

For starters, Indians are used to longer forms of entertainment. Cricket matches last for days. So do Indian weddings. A three-hour movie isn’t long at all in comparison. Also, Indians tend to be value-conscious. They expect a full afternoon or evening of entertainment for the price of a ticket.

But the biggest reason Bollywood films are long is artistic. The time commitment required of the audience heightens their emotional investment in the story. (The same is true of operas, which are often as long or even longer than Hindi films.) The effect can be powerfully moving, even for Americans accustomed to shorter films.

Bollywood movies are getting shorter, though, mostly because there are fewer musical numbers than there used to be. While three and a half hours was once typical, three hours or less is now the norm.

What’s the biggest artistic difference between Bollywood and Hollywood?

In a word: “masala.” The concept of masala is key to understanding Bollywood films. It’s a culinary term that means “spicy mixture.” Masala filmmaking combines more than one genre in the same movie, blending elements of comedy, romance, action, and drama. The goal is to appeal to as many people as possible. That way there’s something for everyone in every film-the grandparents, the parents, the teenagers, the little kids-because Indians often go to the movies as a family.

Hollywood filmmakers do the opposite-they do super-narrow niche marketing to target the demographic groups they think are the most profitable (and then ignore everyone else). One exception to this might be the James Bond movies, which have been enormously successful for decades. There’s action, of course, romance, some campy comedy, and even a little melodrama when James feels bad about his best friend betraying him or his latest lover dying in his arms.

That’s not to say that all Bollywood films are masala. Many strictly fall into one genre or another, but even then, there’s often a dash of masala thrown in.

Do Bollywood actors work in Hollywood?

Aishwarya Rai Bachchan is the first Indian actor to significantly crossover in the West. She appeared in The Mistress of Spices (2005) with Dylan McDermott, The Last Legion (2007) with Colin Firth and Ben Kingsley, and Pink Panther 2 (2009) with Steve Martin. She has also garnered more high-profile publicity in the West than any other Bollywood actor, having appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Late Show with David Letterman, and 60 Minutes.

Two Bollywood actors appeared in the Oscar-winning British film Slumdog Millionaire (that’s right, it’s a British film): Anil Kapoor, who played the sleazy game-show host, and Irrfan Khan, who played the police interrogator. Kapoor has since appeared in the hit American television series 24, which stars actor Kiefer Sutherland. Kapoor played a Middle-Eastern leader in the show for one season. Prior to Slumdog Millionaire, Khan appeared in the English-language films The Namesake (2006), A Mighty Heart (2007), and The Darjeeling Limited (2007).

Bollywood actress Mallika Sherawat will star opposite Avatar actor Laz Alonso in the upcoming Hollywood political comedy, Love, Barack. Sherawat will play a volunteer coordinator on Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign, who falls in love with her counterpart on John McCain’s campaign, played by Alonso. Sherawat is also appearing in another upcoming Hollywood film, Hisss, along with Irrfan Khan.

Do Hollywood actors work in Bollywood?

Sylvester Stallone and Denise Richards made cameo appearances in the Bollywood film Kambakkht Ishq in 2009.

British actor Sir Ben Kingsley-best-known for his Oscar-winning performance as the famous Indian independence leader in Gandhi (1982)-appeared in his first Bollywood film, Teen Patti, in 2010.

Western musicians are breaking into Bollywood, too. American rapper Snoop Dogg performed on the title track of Singh is Kinng in 2008 and Australian pop star Kylie Minogue performed a song in Blue in 2009. Senegalese-American music star Akon is reportedly recording a song for the soundtrack of the upcoming Bollywood superhero action film Ra.One.

Does anyone outside of India watch Bollywood movies?

Yes! Bollywood has fans all over the world. It’s big in other parts of South Asia, of course-Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka-as well as the rest of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Bollywood is beloved in Australia, the home of director Baz Lurhmann (of Moulin Rouge fame) who’s a Bollywood filmmaker in spirit! Bollywood movies are routinely in the box-office top 10 in the U.K. And Bollywood is all the rage in Brazil (thanks to a hit Indian-themed television show there, called Caminho das Indias.) Finally, Bollywood is huge in Canada, particularly in Toronto, which has a large Indian population. And Americans are finally starting to catch on to what the rest of world already knows-that Bollywood is fantastic!

Why don’t more Americans like Bollywood movies?

It’s human nature to mock what we don’t understand. Americans are used to watching Hollywood movies, which reflect our cultural values, traditions, and storytelling techniques, and Bollywood movies reflect another culture’s values, traditions, and storytelling techniques, which are unfamiliar to us. We’ve unfairly maligned Indian cinema because we can’t take it for granted like we can our own. We actually have to do a little thinking when we watch them. Some people find thinking fun; some don’t.

Why would Americans want to watch Bollywood movies?

Why do Americans like pizza? Because it’s good. Who cares what country it comes from? If you like good movies and you’re not watching Bollywood, you’re missing out.

The 10 Components of Fitness

Fitness is a concept that is vastly misunderstood and each individual has his/her own way of defining it.

What most people do not know is that there are 10 components/elements/facets that make up the state of “Fitness”. All these 10 components need to be improved in an individual for him/her to be deemed as physically it.

Now, it doesn’t matter if you are young or old, man or woman; or whether you belong to a certain category of people (bodybuilder, athlete, corporate executive, couch potato, housewife etc). Your fitness program must aim to improve all 10 aspects of fitness.

All human beings are built the same way physiologically. Therefore, we all need each of the components of fitness to enhance the quality of our physical fitness and thereby enhance life.

So….What exactly are the 10 components of fitness?

The 10 Components of Fitness:

1 ) Cardiovascular Endurance: The ability of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems to transport oxygenated blood to the working skeletal muscles for an extended period of time without fatigue.

2 ) Muscular Endurance: The ability of skeletal muscles to continuously contract for an extended length of time without experiencing fatigue.

3 ) Musculoskeletal Strength: The combined strength of muscles,bones,ligaments and tendons.

4 ) Flexibility: The ability of the body to sustain full and complete range of motion around the joints.

5 ) Ideal Body Composition: Maintaining an ideal ratio of adipose tissue(body fat) to lean body mass.A male is said to have an ideal body composition when no more that 15% of his bodyweight is made up of body fat. A female is said to have an ideal body composition if no more than 20% of her bodyweight is made up of body fat.

6 ) Power: It is the ability of the skeletal muscles to maximize the force exerted by them in a minimum amount of time.

7 ) Speed: The ability to minimize the time taken to complete a particular movement or task

8 ) Coordination: Coordination is the combination of body movements created with the kinematic and kinetic parameters that result in intended actions.This involves combining several movements into a single distinct movement.

9 ) Agility: The ability to change the direction of the body in an efficient and effective manner.

10 ) Balance: Ability to maintain the center of gravity of a body within the base of support with minimal postural sway.

For one to be deemed as physically fit, they need to develop all of these aspects of fitness.

The importance and interdependence of the 10 components of fitness in overall performance:

Each of the aforementioned components play a crucial role in our lives. Whether it is for someone who is a competitive sportsman or just a regular human being, each of these components drastically impact overall performance. It must also be noted that each of these components are interdependent on the other and therefore a compromise in one will definitely lead to short-changing another.

  • Cardiovascular endurance: A decrease in this element makes just about every task very difficult. Performing activities like climbing stairs, walking, jogging, running,   swimming , any and all kinds of sports and even strength training becomes extensively difficult with poor cardiovascular endurance. Therefore, a lack of this component makes it difficult to utilize muscular endurance or musculoskeletal strength. For example, even if a runner has great muscular endurance, he will not be able to run for long without cardiovascular endurance. Similarly, a power lifter cannot maximally use his strength once cardiovascular fatigue sets in. Besides these, one’s speed,balance,coordination,agility and power drastically reduce as one reaches cardiovascular fatigue. It must also be noted that very poor cardiovascular endurance can even cause cardiac arrest in the aforementioned activities.
  • Muscular endurance: This is very similar to cardiovascular endurance except that it occurs in the musculoskeletal system and not the cardio respiratory system. A person with poor muscular endurance will experience difficulty in the activities mentioned for cardiovascular endurance. However, this will be due to high build up of lactic acid in the muscles being used for the particular activity. Without muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance cannot be utilized. For eg, even if a kickboxer is not cardiovascularly tired, he will not be able to punch or kick if the muscles in his arms and legs are fatigued. Also, as in cardiovascular endurance, one’s speed,balance,coordination,agility and power are also compromised if one has poor muscular endurance.
  • Musculoskeletal strength: Lack of this component leads to early degeneration of the body. Lack of musculoskeletal strength also exposes the body to a high risk of injuries while performing any task against resistance. It must therefore be noted that athletes belonging to any sport or discipline needs to work on his musculoskeletal strength otherwise he cannot be successful and risks injuring himself. When this component is compromised, activities that require cardiovascular and muscular endurance is not possible as the body will not be able to handle the stress associated with that activity. For example,the body of a marathon runner, cannot handle the stress on his/her joints due to poor musculoskeletal strength even though he has a good amount of endurance.
  • Flexibility: This is one area that is seriously ignored by many sportsmen especially bodybuilders and strength athletes. Flexibility is necessary to prevent occurrence of injuries. A stiff muscle is likely to tear when it is required to go through full range of motion. Since lack of this component results in injuries, it invariably affects each and every other component of fitness.
  • Ideal body composition: An increase in lean muscle mass increases the strength of the musculoskeletal system whereas an increase in body fat increases risk of cardiovascular diseases. When the ideal body composition is lost, all aspects of performance are affected. Excess fat serves as additional luggage for the body to carry and serves as a limiting factor to all other components.Even flexibility is affected by excess body fat as it limits the range of motion of muscles.
  • Power, Speed, Coordination and Agility: These components are especially important for athletes as they need them for their respective disciplines. A reduction of either can drastically limit their performance in their sports. Even the generic population needs to maintain a certain degree of each of these components as they aid in better performance of day to day activities and also contribute to a more lively and healthy feeling.For eg: Power while lifting heavy objects around the house,Speed when running to catch a bus/train to work,Coordination when trying to play games or do basic repair work and agility when performing fun activities like skiing.

Now that you know what the various facets to fitness are, lets take a look on how to develop them.

Developing the components of fitness:

  • Cardiovascular endurance: Performing aerobic activities like walking,jogging,running,cycling,skipping, swimming  etc with low intensity over a long duration without stopping. The intensity should be low enough for a person to do the activity continuously for at least 20 mins. Once the person can do the same activity for 60 mins comfortably, the intensity must be increased either by increasing speed or resistance.
  • Muscular endurance: Contrary to popular belief, it is not achieved by doing resistance training with light weights for high repetitions. Muscular endurance develops along with cardiovascular endurance by doing aerobic exercises.However, unlike cardiovascular endurance which is general to the whole body, muscular endurance is only achieved in those muscles that are used in the aerobic activity. For eg: Running improves cardiovascular endurance in general but muscular endurance only in the lower body. So, to achieve muscular endurance throughout the body, one can perform “Cross training”. The description of cross training is out of the scope of this article and can be found by a mere internet search.
  • Musculoskeletal strength: High intensity weight training (mostly compound and power movements) with heavy weights that induce positive muscular failure between 6-8 reps. This 6-8 rep range must be used only by advanced trainers who have weight training experience of at least 2-3 years. If one is new to weight training, they must first learn correct form using extremely light weights for about 2-3 weeks. After that,they must lift in the 10-12 rep range before they are ready to lift in the 6-8 rep range.
  • Flexibility: Static stretching with at least 10 second holds in mild discomfort while aiming to take the muscle to greater range is the best way to increase flexibility. Stretching must be done at the end of every workout. Avoid stretching cold muscles as there is risk of tear.
  • Power, Speed, Coordination and Agility: These are relative to particular activities to be performed and can be improved through practice and repetition.

So there you have it

“The 10 components of fitness”

Make sure you strive to develop each and every one of them to maximize the utility of the others and thereby become in the true sense of the word……“Physically Fit”

Jumper Ezpad 5SE Review: A New Choice for Daily Office Work

The Surface Tablet PC series from the Microsoft Company is undoubtedly one of the most successful office tablets at the moment. Its success is not only reflected in the Windows 10, which provides strong office support but also because of the important role, the excellent hardware and concise but delicate appearance design. Today, we will talk about the fresh Tablet PC, Jumper Ezpad 5SE, which combines with the classic Surface element but improves on the basis. And now, let’s check it in detail.

Features and Design

Although the body of Jumper Ezpad 5SE is not made of the all-metal material, the plastic part and aluminum alloy part have little chromatic aberration, causing no much influence on the visual effects. The screen outside border of this tablet is of a width of about 15mm, enough for an adult hand-holding. With the dimensions of 27.50 x 17.10 x 1.00 cm, it weighs only 700g.

Stylus and keyboard are the highlights of the Surface tablet and the iPad Pro and very helpful for improving the office productivity. And the Jumper Ezpad 5SE also supports a keyboard and stylus.

Configurations and Performance

Based on the Intel X5 Cherry Trail Z8300 Quad-Core processor clocked at 1.44GHz (up to 1.84GHz), the Jumper Ezpad 5SE is equipped with 4GB DDR3 RAM and 64 GB eMMc memory capacity. In addition, it gets a 10.6-inch IPS screen with the resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels.

In terms of the interfaces, taking care of the needs of business users, EZPad 5SE comes with a number of interfaces to facilitate the connection of a variety of external devices. It comes with two USB interfaces (one of which is a USB 3.0 interface, the other is a USB 2.0 interface), a MiniHDMI port, a TF card slot, and a 3.5mm Earphone port, enough for daily use.

From my own experience, EZPad 5SE performed well in dealing with the stitching of single and multiple pictures, smoothly and rapidly. As for the web browsing and video playback, this novelty performed not very differently with a general notebook. And the battery can last for about 6 hours in the normal use, enough for the daily mobile office work.

Summary

The Jumper Ezpad 5SE is really a compact tablet. And it would be a good choice for the office workers or school students, especially for those who are seeking for fashion and portability. I think it would be a good new choice for daily office work.

The History of Pokemon – How Did Pokemon Become Popular?

The history of Pokemon began with one single japan man named Satoshi Tajiri. It was his hobby. Over time he decided to put his idea of catching creatures into practice, to give children the same thrills he had as a child of catching insects and tadpoles. Tajiri and friends worked a lot of hours on designs and Tajiri even went with unpaid hours to make his dreams come true for the game. It nearly drove partners bankrupt, and several employees quit due to financial conditions. The first Pokemon games, Pokemon red and green, came to Japan on February 27, 1996, which fulfilled Tajiri’s dreams. Because of the success rate in Japan with the Pokemon games, they released it overseas.

The anime, as well as Pokemon Yellow, marked Pikachu as the most popular and recognized creature in Pokemon history, turning it into the franchise’s mascot. This led to a small spin-off game called Hey You, Pikachu!, which was released in Japan on December 12, 1998, and in North America on November 6, 2000. This was a virtual-pet game, utilizing the Nintendo 64’s Voice Recognition Unit to let the players interact verbally with Pikachu. When the anime finished following the games’ story with Ash’s defeat in the Pokémon League in January 1999, it started a new season in a new region called the Orange Archipelago.

A major overhaul of the main game series occurred when Pokemon arrived on the Game Boy Advance on November 21, 2002 when Ruby and Sapphire Versions were released in Japan. Trainers found themselves in the southern land called Hoenn where 135 new Pokemon were waiting to be discovered. The games reached North America on March 18, 2003 and had many new features, the most prominent being Pokemon Contests, Double Battles, Pokemon Abilities and Natures for each Pokemon. Also introduced in these versions were more types of weather and two new villain teams, Team Magma and Team Aqua..

The anime began a new series, Advanced Generation series, which started in Japan on the same day as the release of the games and reached North America almost a year later. A great deal was changed in this series, including the introduction of a new main character, May, based on her game counterpart.

There are several generations of Pokemon, and there is still future generations to come. When the world changes, so does the world of Pokemon. 2016 marks the 20th anniversary of Pokemon, and will be celebrated by the re-release of the original Generation I core series games on the Nintendo 3DS’s. There are currently six generations of Pokemon, and over this time period, there are many games, including spin offs, along with anime, movies, manga, a Trading Card Game, music, and a musical.

Make a Personal Commitment to Change Your Life!

So, is this really where you thought you’d be? You’re 25, or 35, or even 50 or ?? and you’re not doing the job you thought you’d be… or you’re not living where you thought you’d be. Maybe you haven’t written that novel you wanted to? Maybe you haven’t travelled to all those places you dreamed about as a kid? Maybe your health isn’t so great. So, what’s gotten in the way of your dreams? Tough question isn’t it?

“Right Wendy… easy for you to say! I’ve got a mortgage, kids, I can’t just dump all that and walk away! Give me a break!”

That’s definitely NOT what I’m suggesting you do, but what I am suggesting is that you start to make some plans for what you want out of life. Did you know that a recent survey of Harvard graduates showed that of the 5% of them who WROTE DOWN THEIR GOALS 90% ACHIEVED THEM!! Those sound like GREAT odds to me!

I’m one of those people who learn from the lessons of others – good and bad. That Harvard lesson is one I’ll take to heart. If writing down my goals will work I’ll do it – hey I’ve done it before and it’s worked.

Here’s a few other bits of inspiration! Michelangelo was 71 when he was appointed chief architect of St. Peters Cathedral in Rome. George Bernard Shaw wrote “Farfetched Fables” at 93. Picasso was still painting at 90. So you see it’s NEVER TOO LATE!

I’ve created this very simple tool to help YOU get started. I call it Wendy’s Personal Commitment and it allows you to keep focused on your goals by writing them down, and breaking them down into small, manageable, easy to do parts. By looking at them daily and taking action on them in small increments success comes much more easily and has a higher “staying power”.

Here’s an example that everyone (pretty much) can relate to at this time of year – LOSING WEIGHT! Let’s say you want to lose 30 pounds – you’re fed up with being overweight and feeling really lousy about yourself for not being able to lose those excess pounds. You have FINALLY decided “THIS IS IT”. You have gotten so uncomfortable you are now willing to make a change. (*Be sure to check with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program.) Losing 30 pounds should safely take you about 15 weeks – 2 pounds per week is what doctors tell us is safe, and by losing it at that rate we are much more likely to keep it off in the long run. Who wants to lose all that weight only to have it return? So let’s do this right, and keep it off!

So, let’s use our example of losing weight, and our goal of losing 30 pounds in 15 weeks. If today is January 1, then the final goal date for losing all the weight is April 9. Each pound of fat contains 3500 calories, so we know we need to burn 3500 calories to reduce one pound of fat.

Why not go online and find out how many calories are burned by doing various activities and include those in the plan? Here’s just a few:

1 hour high intensity aerobics 400 calories

basketball game 473 calories

bowling 177 calories

swimming, fast, freestyle 550 calories

By including these calculations into the plan you can see how many calories will be used by exercise. Next, design a food plan that will provide you with the nutrients you need, while tasting great and going overboard on calories. Again, my first resource is the internet – there are literally thousands of sites to search that have recipes and food plans for every kind of diet you can imagine – low fat, low calorie, low carb, vegetarian – you name it – you’ll find it!

There’s an old joke “How do eat an elephant?” – “one bite at a time” – it’s the same FOR ANY GOAL. Break your goals down into smaller chunks or pieces that are managable. Work backwards by putting the large goal at the end and then work your way backwards to where you are today.

If you know that by January 8 you should have lost 2 pounds, by January 15 you should have lost 4 pounds, and so on, your goal becomes “do-able”, and easier to reach.

TIPS:

1) Have a buddy – either a close friend to whom you can report in your progress to, or a professional coach or email friend. There’s nothing like knowing you’ve got someone cheering you on to keep you going when you feel like giving up!

2) Have a contingency plan for those “tough days”. Example: for tough diet days have some really luscious low calorie or low carb snacks that stave off the urge to blow the diet – save them for special treats only. For tough days in other situations related to other types of goals think up other rewards that really make you feel special and nurtured – you deserve it for working hard!

3) Keep a journal – writing down your feelings and emotions – good and bad – is a great idea. It will help provide you with something to look back on when you’ve reached your goal, plus if you’re tempted to cheat you can see your hard work in black and white and that will help you stick to your plan. Who knows, maybe you can even turn your journal into a book and make some money from it?

COMMITMENT EXAMPLE

If the Commitment below were to be used for the example of losing weight that was discussed above, it would have some of the following information included in the columns.

Goal Action

Date

Weight 150 Plan weekly menus, call personal trainer

January 1, 2005

Weight 148 Work out with trainer 3x, try new meal plan

January 8, 2005

etc…

Weight 120 Celebrate reaching goal!

April 9, 2005

MY PERSONAL COMMITMENT

Commitment for ___________________________________________

I, ______________________________________________________, have declared, on this day,

__________________, of _____________________, 2_____, that I am ready to make a change in my life! I am

strong, confident and prepared to move forward and make positive things happen in my future.

The change that I will make is: ____________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________________

and this will be completed by this date: __________________________________________.

Since this is a large goal a number of smaller goals must be met before this large one is fulfilled. Below is an

outline of these smaller goals, and the dates they are to be met:

Goal Action(s) Date

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

6)

7)

I am truly excited about being able to make this change in my life, and realize it is just the first of many things in

my life that I am finally able to take control of. I will post this commitment to myself where I can see it daily and

be reminded of it as I work toward my final goal.

Signed __________________________________________ Date

________________________________

——————————————————————

NOTE: The above exercise and worksheet is an example of one of the tools that I use when working as a coach with clients

Trampolines and Outdoor Toys

When you think of toys for children, people generally think of a games console, remote control cars or maybe dolls. Due to the bad weather in the UK, this is not surprising but there is always a great demand for outdoor toys to which some may find surprising but when you look what is on offer for your children, you may realise they are missing a treat.

During the summer months, the most popular outdoor toy hands down has got to be the trampoline, due to its exhilarating feeling that it gives when you shoot up in the air, being able to jump so much higher with other people on a large trampoline. What is good about a trampoline for children is that it gives them a great amount of exercise without them realising which in this day and age, is a very positive point. So many children have been raised without playing outdoors enough, but are addicted to games consoles, television and mp3 players and very rarely venture outdoors.

Outdoor activities give children a large amount of life skills such as how it feels to fall over and how to cope with it, nasty but something many children do not experience so later in life have not developed in other areas to such as social interaction with other children and adults. There are other types of outdoor toys which can help with this, which let children gain confidence, strength and overall health due to the aerobic side to having fun with them.

After trampolines, the next popular outdoor toy has got to be the climbing frame. In many parks, you find metal climbing frames which are two or three meters in height, with some having plastic tunnels on the ground to add an extra thrill. There are good, but even more popular are wooden climbing frames which can be huge and have a old fashioned look which when purchased for your back garden, lets it blend into the surroundings very well and does not give an intrusive feel.

With these frames, you usually get some sort of lookout tower, or two on the larger climbing frames which a clatter bridge in between. To get down to the ground are usually a pair or steps or even more fun, a slide which all kids love. Usually you will get add-ons such as swings, climbing ropes or climbing walls which give children a great workout but so much fun at the same time.

Similar to these are wooden playhouses which can be very orientated towards girls, but there are models available such as a cowboy hideout or climbing tower. These have a large amount of detail and some have an upstairs but do not give as much physical fun but to get fresh air is much better than sitting in front of that computer game.

Lastly there are go karts which we have all had a go in at one point in our lives, with some models having strong breaks, a large comfortable seat so much more luxurious than bog standards karts you would find a few years ago. So whichever activity you look for, from Jumpking trampolines to action tramps climbing frames, giving children the opportunity to give life experience and aerobic activity has only got to be a good thing.